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Differences between Mhz in ram and mb in cpu cache?

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  • Differences between Mhz in ram and mb in cpu cache?

    Is there a big difference between the following:

    1GB Shared Dual Channel DDR2 SDRAM at 533MHz

    1GB Shared Dual Channel DDR2 SDRAM at 667MHz - $50 more



    Also, is there a big difference between these two:

    Intel® Core™ Duo Proc T2250 (1.73GHz/533MHz/2 X 1MB L2 Cache)

    Intel® Core™ 2 Duo processor T7200 (4MB Cache/2.00GHz/667MHz FSB) - $225 more


    This notebook will be used primarily for graphics (Illustrator and Photoshop CS2) and also for gaming (I've added the 256MB NVIDIA® GeForce™ Go 7900 GS). I'd like to save as much as possible.
    Last edited by Errica; Oct 1, 2006, 02:22 PM.

  • #2
    If you go with the first processor, you don't need to go with the 667MHz memory since it would only run at 533MHz since that processor only has a 533MHz front side bus.

    As for the difference between the two processors, I'm not really sure exactly. The core 2 processor is the new one that came out not too long ago as I recall. Both are pretty good though.
    OracleGuy

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    • #3
      The Core Duo is based on the (32-bit) Pentium M microarchitecture, and the Core 2 Duo is based on the (64-bit) Core microarchitecture, and is meant have 20% more processing power at the same clockspeed and power consumption.
      Geoffrey Sneddon

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      • #4
        4MB Cache ... I just got the Core 2 Duo 6600 (2x2.4Ghz) & it flies , I don't know if you would be able to `feel` the increase in memory speed but these new twin core Duo's kick serious butt ... & I am normally an AMD guy, this is the first time I have ever spent big bucks on a processor and despite the pain my wallet feels.... so far its been worth every cent.
        resistance is...

        MVC is the current buzz in web application architectures. It comes from event-driven desktop application design and doesn't fit into web application design very well. But luckily nobody really knows what MVC means, so we can call our presentation layer separation mechanism MVC and move on. (Rasmus Lerdorf)

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