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  • Conditional Comments and SEO

    I wasn't exactly sure where to post this question, so this forum seemed as good as any....

    I'm just curious about how search engine spiders react to conditional comments, and to go one step further, generally how they react to anything enclosed within <!-- --> tags....

    For example, if your file is "top-heavy" with conditional comments (or any kind of comments for that matter), does this adversely affect a spider's ability to extract the relevant content on your page?

    I was always told to keep the relevent content (i.e., the text minus all of the HTML, JS, and CSS formatting) as close to to the top of the file as possible to facilitate spidering....with IE 7 looming, and the need to use conditional comments an absolute necessity now that CSS hacks are out of the picture, will the additional conditional comments at the top of our files bother web spiders at all? And if so, is there a way to address this problem?

    As I said, no emergency here, just wondering...
    Regards, R.J.

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  • #2
    You really only need one or two conditional comments in the page to detect IE6 and possibly IE7. They shouldn't significantly impact on search engines evaluating your page content since they will be in the <head> of the page and not in the <body>.
    Stephen
    Learn Modern JavaScript - http://javascriptexample.net/
    Helping others to solve their computer problem at http://www.felgall.com/

    Don't forget to start your JavaScript code with "use strict"; which makes it easier to find errors in your code.

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    • #3
      The good news is CSS hacks are back in play

      http://www.ejeliot.com/blog/63
      Web Design Southampton

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      • #4
        Let's hope you're being sarcastic....Past precendence illustrates that hacks aren;t forward compatible....so anyone that uses a CSS hack now for IE 7? will likely end up redoing their CSS come time for the release of IE 8....
        Regards, R.J.

        ---------------------------------------------------------

        Help spread the word! Like our YouTube-to-Mp3 Conversion Script on Facebook !! :-)
        [Instructional videos and tutorials are also available on YouTube, Dailymotion, and Vimeo]
        Explore all products and services, view demos, review documentation, check prices, and more!
        ♪♪ …Need Web Hosting For Our YouTube-To-Mp3 Conversion Software? Check Here !!… ♪♪

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        • #5
          I think that decision comes down to the developer. You would be certainly right if say a website had a long shelf life but some sites get re-designed bi-yearly. If that is the case then its just your external css style sheet that you have to deal with, long before IE8. If we were to leave conditional comments in the html then really after a browser is dead, i would be tempted to delete them out to clean the code up a bit, althought not nessesary, but if was a large static website thats a lot of pages to clean.

          I think using a hack or coditional comment is a desicion that a skilled developer should be able to make, and if the decision was wrong, then only you will be responsible for making the site cross-compatible.
          Web Design Southampton

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